In 2009, the United States Office of Personnel Management reported that approximately 103,000 federal employees were teleworking. However, fewer than 14,000 were teleworking three or more days per week.[18] In January 2012, Reuters, drawing from an Ipsos/Reuters poll, predicted that telecommuting was "a trend that has grown and one which looks like it will continue with 34% of connected workers saying they would be very likely to telecommute on a full-time basis if they could."[3] On December 9, 2010, the U.S. Federal Government passed the Telework Enhancement Act of 2010[19] in order to improve Continuity of Operations and ensure essential Federal functions are maintained during emergencies; to promote management effectiveness when telework is used to achieve reductions in organizational and transit costs and environmental impacts; and to enhance the work-life balance of workers. For example, telework allows employees to better manage their work and family obligations and thus helps retain a more resilient Federal workforce better able to meet agency goals.[20]
Home-based work can be broken down into two separate categories: jobs where you work for yourself (and have unlimited income potential) and jobs in which you work for somebody else (with an income ceiling). Neither type necessarily requires you to work full-time. However, these are all online jobs – which means you’ll need a high-speed internet connection in order to work from home.
Simon Slade, CEO and co-founder of Affilorama has experienced first hand the benefits of having remote workers at his company, “By allowing employees to work remotely," he says, "you can hire the best of the best while not limiting yourself by geographical restrictions. At Doubledot Media, 19 of our 28 employees work remotely, and I have seen no difference in job satisfaction or work performance. If anything, my remote employees' production rate is higher because they are better equipped to avoid distractions.” The benefits also extend to his bottom line, “telecommuting saves me money because they pay for their own computer, electricity and other utilities.”
Provider Relations Advocate – SNF National Accounts – UnitedHealth Group: “This Provider Relations Advocate role with UnitedHealth Group will call on your knowledge, your energy and your commitment to making health care work more effectively for more people. We’re building better, more effective provider networks every day. In this role, you’ll use your strong customer service orientation and knowledge of insurance claims to serve as an advocate for providers in our networks. As you do, you’ll discover the impact you want and the resources, backing and opportunities that you’d expect from a Fortune 6 leader. Required Qualifications: High school diploma or equivalent work experience; 4+ years of health care/managed care experience; 2+ years of provider relations and/or provider network experience; Intermediate level of proficiency in claims processing and issue resolution; 1+ years experience with Medicare and Medicaid regulations; Proficiency with MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access”

“As a programmer, I need large chunks of time to really make progress on a project,” states Ann Gaffigan, CTO of Land Pros Systems, Inc., “In an office, there are so many potential distractions, with people knocking on the door or customers stopping in. This way I can control when I answer calls and emails and when I 'go silent' to get some work done.”


More than ever, writers are needed to formulate news articles, create content, and come up with the creative ideas that fill the pages of nearly every site on the Internet. And although many bigger sites have in-house writers, a growing number of sites outsource their content and hire freelance writers and content creators. Writing experience is very helpful, but what you really need to get started are drive, ambition, and the ability to find a unique angle on events that happen every day.
With so many businesses operating mostly, or even completely, online, it’s no wonder that many hire virtual assistants to help keep them organized and complete administrative tasks. According to the International Virtual Assistants Association, these workers are “independent contractors who (from a remote location, usually their home or office) support multiple clients in a variety of industries by providing administrative, creative, and technical services.”

Med Trans, Inc. provides medical transcription services to doctors' offices and healthcare facilities across the US We recruit and train contractors to work from home either full-time or part-time as ... Work at home and at your own pace; You make your own schedule; Ability to work day or night depending on your preference; High demand in several industries for transcribers; Ability to spend more time with ... 

It’s a common answer when you ask people why they like to work from home. Most will respond that their flexible work environment relieves the amount of stress in their lives and gives them a healthier work-life balance. Today, our offices are constantly on, it isn't the same as it was decades ago, when you left the office and work actually ended. Today, most of us can work at any hour wherever we are located, so it makes sense that the line is starting to blur between work and life. But it stands to reason that working from home can help redefine—or at the very least, rebalance—that line.
But once you’re in your home office—alone, every day—you might start to miss that collegial camaraderie. Since the UPS incident, I’ve reached out more to colleagues via IM and will post cute pics of my new puppy for my colleagues to see on Yammer. And when we’re on deadline, we even (gasp!) talk on the phone. It’s helped tremendously to make the disconnect not feel so severe. It’s a good balance between having peace and quiet when you need it and much-needed interaction with others, too.
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